Portraits Poetry Series #33: Winter’s Harvest

 Portraits Series
It is winter, isn’t it
When frost bites
The last fruits
Upon the vine
Lost to another time
And snow lay
In blankets
Upon the branch
The bitter cold
Trips in the wind
And ravages
What is left
Brown edges
Whisper
Of decay
And nectar,
Once sweet
Now dry
And dying
Only to become
The seed
That plants
Tomorrow’s harvest.

© Sumyanna 2016

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16 Comments Add yours

  1. 7128788elf says:

    Reblogged this on charles1958 and commented:
    An absolutely wonderfully autumnal poem, from one of my favourite poets. Please give her blog a visit, you won’t regret it.

    Like

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you so very much for sharing. I highly appreciate it!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 7128788elf says:

        Pleasure, have had 13 likes so far, hope some of them have been over to look a t your blog. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. 7128788elf says:

    Wonder poem, just saying exactly how the autumn (sorry fall) crackles into winter, but there is that knowledge of a wonderful new beginning. Yes this is a fantastic piece well done, I think I might re-blog it, and share it, so that others can share his wonderful poem. Best wishes and blessings, Charles.

    Like

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Oh, it goes by many names. No one more correct than another. 🙂 Thank you so very much. Do you have much in the way of seasons there?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 7128788elf says:

        We do have seasons, but not really in the way you do. In the Western Cape we belong to the Winter rainfall area, so get heavy cyclonic rains with cold fronts, driving in from the Atlantic, many of them starting from the Antarctic, and and just reaching a bit north of the Cape. Snow is only on the mountains surrounding Cape Town, and not very often. It is a moderate climate, virtually never going down to below zero degrees centigrade, and seldom going up into the 30C’s, though with global warming we are having more and more days over 30 in summer, and have even had some days go up into the 40’s. The rest of the country is in the summer rainfall area and receives its rains in summer via short very heavy thunderstorms. It is weird in winter though when the temperature goes down to well below zero, and by midday is in the mid 20s! Some snow falls in the Easter Cape, KwaZulu/Natal the Free state and Mpumulanga (the place where the sun rises). A lot of the country is desert and semi-desert, so most of the country is very dry.

        Like

        1. Sumyanna says:

          I think it would be so interesting to witness the seasons of different places. I am sure there are even subtle differences in places that don’t seem to have them. I don’t know – I guess I am a romantic about things like nature. It just seems so interesting that we all live in the same planet, though there are so many differences from one place to another. I grew up in a place that was truly winter all season long. Here, we do have days of warmer weather interspersed with snow. You can sometimes go out without a jacket and before getting home it is snowing again. I remember winters where the snow was a high as my father’s waist and he was 6″2′. I just find it amazing.

          Thank you so much for sharing as it truly does open my eyes a little more. I find it fascinating!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. 7128788elf says:

            Yes I also enjoy being in nature, and looking a t differences. Did you originally come from the far north like Alaska. I have only been in countries where it snows everywhere in winter twice, once in Greece in March, where it Snowed in Athens, and in Britain in January and February, where it did not snow. here there are defined seasons, but not quite like up there in the northern hemisphere.Even the hours of sunlight don’t change that much. In summer it starts getting light just before 5 am, and twilight extends the hours of light until near 8pm. In winter the sun comes up just after seven in the morning and it is dark by quarter to six.When asked why I did not move to Britain, I said I am just to used to my eight hours of sun per day, which we have for about 85% of the year. Spring is definitely breading season, and Genevieve and I were lucky that we had several breeding couples of birds, including two Egyptian Geese (actually ducks!) here, and now we see them with their little family happily eating and taking to the water. It was amazing to see these various birds loose their ordinary plumage and get their breeding plumage, and then back again. So yes I love nature too. Best wishes and blessings, Charles.

            Like

          2. Sumyanna says:

            That would be been interesting – Alaska. Nope. I was born in Canada and lived there till I was 8 years old then moved back to the US and lived in New Jersey. Depending on where you live, winter is winter. In Jersey (we lived in the mountains) we got snow and lots of it. Here in Colorado, it snows and melts the next day (but I don’t live in the mountains). I have also lived in the south where it did not snow at all (at least while we were living there).

            Sounds absolutely beautiful. Hope you both are soaking it all in 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          3. 7128788elf says:

            With my orthotic socks on in this heat things are a bit uncomfortable. Canada, that’s interesting, my wife Genevieve was also born in Canada, but left just after her first birthday. I was born in Cape Town and having spent 27 years there, have moved back to Cape Town. it is wonderful to be back. Best wishes and blessings, Charles.

            Like

          4. Sumyanna says:

            A few years ago it used to get pretty hot here, but over the years it has calmed down quite a bit. It gets hot but not that hot (thank goodness). I enjoy temperatures that are pretty moderate because I love to get outdoors and do things. I want to brave the cold to do things, but sometimes you cannot pick your own family 🙂 Well, we have younger kids and I worry about them being in the cold all day. Hoping we might do some things this winter.

            Liked by 1 person

          5. 7128788elf says:

            Here any break in the prevailing weather pattern is used, so in winter, if it stops raining hard, one rushes off to work in the garden or have a walk before the heavy rains return. In summer one goes outdoors when the temperature drops a bit; one certainly doesn’t want to get stuck outside in temperatures well over 30C.

            Liked by 1 person

          6. Sumyanna says:

            Yes! You have to take it when you can get it 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

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