Our Heritage: The Earth We Share with Ancestral Pueblo Indians

Mesa Verde was home to the Ancestral Pueblo Indians for over 700 years.  There, they raised their children, built communities, and left their footprint before moving on to other places.  No one know exactly why they left.  While they were here, they were hunter/gatherers, as well as subsistence farmers – growing crops like corn, beans, and squash.  Most amazing are the beautiful stone communities they built, nestled in the alcoves of canyon walls.

 

The trip we made there was educational.  Not only did we learn about the lives and ways these people lived, but we also realized just how much our heritage belongs to the many people who came before us.  While not related, we are one in that we walk the same earth.  To me, I was just amazed while looking through the dwellings – realizing that I was possibly standing where Ancenstral Pueblo Indians once stood, looking over their homeland.  I could not help but wonder, what their thoughts were back then, what were their dreams, and what did they think of the world around them.

 

Their homes are now preserved in Mesa Verde National Park, located in Montezuma County, Colorado.  This park protects some of the best preserved sites for Ancestral Puebloan archeology in the United States.  According to Wikipedia, the park was created by President  Theodore Roosevelt in 1906, and the park occupies 52,485 acres near the Four Corners Region of the American Southwest.  The park includes more than 5,000 sites, including 600 cliff dwellings, and is the largest archaeological preserve in the U.S.

 

I cannot help but feel bad for the atrocities so many countries, including my own, have committed against Native peoples.  I truly do not know the journey of each and every person that has passed by this way or any other, but wherever you turn, you hear stories of such incredible sorrow.  I cannot help but feel for them deeply.

 

I personally feel a connection to the people who have come before me.  Even though I will never know many of the people who stepped on this soil, I do think of those whose stories were never told and those I can only imagine based on the heritage that we now preserve.  I only wish that I could learn more… and in the end, I must remind myself always, what am I going to leave behind?

 

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(c) Sumyanna 2017

 

Submitted for The Daily Post Photography Challenge: Heritage

 

Other Fabulous Posts for the Photography Challenge:

Our Everyday

Travels and Trifles

My Guilty Pleasures

Inner Alpha

Journeys with Johnbo

Sheri Rose

TVOR Travels

 

 

 

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17 Comments Add yours

  1. Beautiful photos

    Like

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you so very much!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. odell01 says:

    Interesting information and beautiful photography, too. Together, it reminds me why I enjoy following your blog on this platform so much. Cheers!

    Like

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you very much. I am enjoying finally getting out there to take more photos. I wish we could go back sometime soon. It truly was a beautiful visit.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. leigha66 says:

    Looks like a truly breathtaking place. Thanks for sharing the amazing photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      It was rather amazing. I am afraid of heights and to think, they actually cut holes in the walls to crawl down to where they lived. It was a good way to keep away attackers though. We had to go down a long ladder to get there and then had to climb one on the way up.

      Like

  4. I enjoyed this post so much, Sumyanna. The photographs are lovely and your narrative is very informative but also deeply emotional.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you Robbie. It was a wonderful visit. I actually hope to go back since our littlest one did not get to go. Just to think who you share this earth with… it can be amazing. To see proof of their existence is just awe inspiring.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderful photos and you have added a layer to my own knowledge. I included a quote by Theodore Roosevelt where he expressed the heritage that he believed was not understood but needed to be preserved for their children and their children’s children forever. He did more than talk, you have let us know he acted.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you very much. So very true… he did more than talk. I just hope that we don’t lose places like that. We tend to not value what we have until it is gone…

      Liked by 1 person

  6. viveka says:

    Thank you so much for your support!!! Have never heard about this before, thanks for sharing, very interesting …. know very little about the native Americans.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      You’re welcome 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. These are remarkable photos of a fascinating site and heritage.

    Like

  8. keli471 says:

    Great Pictures! I have been there, it was years ago when I was little, but seeing the pictures made me remember that trip, it truly is an amazing site!

    Like

    1. Sumyanna says:

      We have not been there for a few years, but I am hoping we can go back. It was an amazing visit.

      Like

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