Birth of the Written Word, a poem

on

This is another fourteen line poem…

sad (2)

The best way I know to show my love
is to write the words down, to capture their meaning
allowing them to gently tumble from my fingertips
dance upon my brow and wage war with my inner thoughts.
I was never open as a child, I was a victim of circumstance –
raising your voice, speaking out of turn, or just speaking in general, was looked down upon.
I miss the long conversations I could have held, the questions I could have asked
I too miss the silent pauses, the ruminating of thoughts and the sharing of my soul.
Is this why I ache to write words down – that I writhe at the thought of silence?
What boldness lingers beneath my tongue that forces its winding way to speech?
When I had the choice, I learned to speak, and even before that, I learned to write the words.
This is where I found my strength and where I learned to never let those words fail me.
I learned to let them speak loudly and boldly – I learned to let them fall fiercely with intent
and as my soul sought understanding of why others weep, I too learned to weep in empathy with words.

© Sumyanna 2017

 

Beautiful image courtesy of Pixabay.com

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15 Comments Add yours

  1. A lovely post, Sumyanna. My Mother was brought up in a home where children were seen but not heard. Times have changed and my 14 year old has opinions on everything [smile].

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you. Yes, it is not an easy way to grow up. Oh, and that last part… made me smile in recognition 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! There’s a sadness to this poem, but it’s incredibly powerful – much of your poetry is, but this is expecially so.
    I don’t keep up with your words as I would like… this is my loss.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you Jane. Yes, growing up was not an easy thing – but I am glad how it has shaped who I am now. Thank you so very much for your kind words.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I thought you probably felt that way.
        Your example is yet another proof that a difficult childhood doesn’t have to negatively impact on parenting.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Sumyanna says:

          I think I seriously learned to parent the way I do from my parents. I looked at how it made me feel and decided to change things. It is never easy – to fight against what you have grown up with, but I can’t help but remember those conversations I had in my head growing up, thinking this isn’t fair. I would not want to do the same thing to anyone.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Did you have any other siblings? If so, what did they take from their childhood experience?

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Sumyanna says:

            I have two brothers. One moved far away and does not keep in touch at all. The other lives with my mom. He essentially forgives and forgets – there is no mention. I don’t know if it is healthy or not for him. He got married, got divorced, no kids. He just goes to work and comes home every day with little to look forward to. I feel that my parents robbed both of them of better experiences in adulthood (especially them) as I was older and understood more, if that makes sense. I can’t help but feel sad for them.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. I agree – that’s very sad. I have a feeling that women tend to have more ability to work through childhood difficulties than men, maybe partly because men are expected to be stoic and less emotional, so they hold their pain in.

            Liked by 1 person

          4. Sumyanna says:

            I tend to agree with you. Perhaps it robs them of a way to actually cope with hardship. I feel bad for them in so many ways, but it is difficult to talk with them about it when they refuse to acknowledge anything. It’s not to say they say nothing happened… they say they don’t want to talk about it. As my brother says, he wants to forgive and forget. I sometimes with I could have done more to protect them, but at the same time I knew I could not do much. Over time, the distance between us grew and it seems we are such different people. They don’t even call… ever. My meaning to them has kind of been erased off of the map. I still call, but they seemed bored…

            Liked by 1 person

          5. You bring back the memories they want to forget…?

            Liked by 1 person

          6. Sumyanna says:

            Most likely

            Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautifully expressed. : )

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sumyanna says:

      Thank you so very much!

      Liked by 1 person

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